DROGHEDA | BALBRIGGAN | INCHICORE | CLONDALKIN | COLLINS AVENUE, DONNYCARNEY

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Have I a Callus on my foot?

Registered Chiropodists Hayes and Associates are experts in the treatment of Calluses and Corns on the foot.  As well as treating the condition they can also offer professional advice on preventing Calluses and Corns from re-occurring.

What is a Callus?

Callus or hard skin on the foot is an accumulation of several layers of the epithelium (top layer of our skin). This occurs due to a variety of factors, some of which include:Callus and hard skin on the heel

  1. Unsuitable or poorly fitting footwear
  2. Deformity of the foot (hammer toe, bunions etc)
  3. High activity levels can cause Calluses or hard skin on the foot.
  4. Standing for long periods of time can be one of the factors that can cause a Callus or hard skin on your foot.

What are the signs of a Callus?

As the stresses of friction and pressure on the skin occur, the body’s way of protecting the area is in the formation of hard skin or Callus and / or Corns on your feet. The visible signs of a Callus is hard skin on the heel, hard skin on the toe or hard skin on the foot. This then causes extra pressure and less room in your footwear, thus resulting in a cycle of Calluses and Corns.

 

What causes a Callus?

When we walk or stand our body weight is carried, first on the heel of our foot and then on the ball of our foot where the skin is naturally thicker to withstand the pressure. When there is excessive pressure on your feet some areas of the skin thicken in the form of a Corn or Callus. This is a protective response by the body to limit injury to your foot and can appear anywhere the skin rubs against a bone, a shoe, or the ground. This friction can be what causes a Callus or Corn.

 

Inappropriate footwear can be a factor in the formation of a Callus or Corn

Most Calluses are symptoms of an underlying problem like a bone deformity, a particular style of walking, high activity or inappropriate footwear. Some people have a natural tendency to form Calluses because of their skin type. Elderly people have less fatty tissue on their feet and this can lead to a Callus forming on the ball of the foot.

 

How to treat a Callus?

You can control a small amount of hard skin by gently rubbing with a pumice stone, or chiropody sponge occasionally when you are in the bath. Use a moisturising cream daily on your feet. If this does not appear to be working, seek advice from registered chiropodists Hayes and Associates.

 

Painful Callus on my foot

If the callus is painful and feels as if you are “walking on stones”, consult registered chiropodists Hayes and Associates who, as well as treating the condition, will be able to advise you as to what caused the Callus and where possible, how to prevent Calluses forming again.

Hayes and Associates can also remove hard skin, relieve foot pain, and redistribute pressure on your foot with soft padding, strapping the foot, or corrective appliances which fit easily into your shoes. The skin on your feet should then return to their normal state.

 

Loss of natural padding on the foot

The elderly can benefit from padding to the ball of the foot to compensate for any loss of natural padding that may occur. Emollient creams can delay Callus building up on the foot and help improve the skin’s natural elasticity. Hayes and Associates are the best people to advise you on the most appropriate skin preparations for your feet. It is always better to consult the experts and when it comes to foot care Hayes and Associates are number one in the North East.

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